drawlequin

drawlequin:

kitandcat:

The Black Bull of Norroway is a graphic novel based off of a classic fairy tale. It features a strong heroine, Sibylla, and a diverse cast of characters that, we hope, will offer representation to a variety of groups. The comic is a collaborative work from artist-writer-sister team, Kit and Cat Seaton, who have finally come together for the sake of this work.

ABOUT THE STORY

Sibylla is just nine years old when the forest witch changes her life forever. A prophecy: she will be the bride the Black Bull of Norroway. In some ways, this is a blessing. As Sibylla grows she can avoid the advances of other boys, claiming a betrothal to a creature who may or may not exist. Sure, her life may be a life of waiting, but it is her own. Until the Bull comes to collect his due, and Sibylla discovers the prophecy wasn’t simply mincing words. The Bull is, quite literally, a bull.
This story follows Sibylla as she struggles to come to terms with her fate, a fate she’s not sure that she wants. Along the way, she must question the very nature of humanity itself. What makes a man? Is it blood and bone? Is it mercy, compassion? Or is it something else?
A tale of expectations and crushing reality, truth and illusion, The Black Bull of Norroway is more than just another fairy tale adaptation. It is a beautifully illustrated glimpse into the human condition.

ABOUT THE CREATORS

Kit and Cat Seaton are a team of sisters who strive to tell stories to illuminate the dark. Both have been devoted to their respective crafts from childhood, always harboring the ambition to draw, to write, to create art that possesses a breath of life.
At eight years age difference, it wasn’t until Kit returned from her first year of college that the two began to combine their talents. Cat writes the script, and Kit transforms words into images. They have tossed around many projects and now, after years of striving to find the right story, Kit and Cat are ready to begin sharing their vision with the world.

Our fundraising campaign will launch on Patreon on Oct. 1st. The webcomic will go live on Oct. 31st, update weekly, and be free to the public to read. Please follow us on Tumblr, Facebook, and Twitter @petramagpie to receive updates! We’re so excited to show you what we’ve made, and there is so more to come!

Kit & Cat

Here’s a quick glimpse of what I’ve been working on all Summer! I’m so excited about this project, please help us out and share the news!

This looks amazing! Mark your calendars for Oct.1, folks!

chrissamnee

sequentialstudies:

Un Grand Talent!

Today’s post showcases the extremely talented French artist Pierre Alary. His compositions and storytelling are so well constructed that one need not understand the French language to enjoy his work. With an animated flare to his line, the characters he pens move across the page with a fluid grace. The way he moves the camera around keeps each page exciting even in the simple moments. Look up this fantastic storyteller if you haven’t already.

All Artwork Copyright © Pierre Alary

deantrippe
comicsalliance:

REVIVAL, REINVENTION, RESURRECTION: THE POWER OF GREAT SUPERHERO COSTUME DESIGN
By Andrew Wheeler
We live in a time of awesome superhero costumes in comics. The rise and rise of cosplay culture, the emergence of comic artists with a savvy understanding of fashion, and the slow diversification that’s making heroes palatable to a broader audience, have all contributed to a costuming culture with more to offer than capes and pants.
Superhero costumes have always been an asset to the industry, because iconography helps establish character and create a brand. But the value of costumes in reaching audiences and reinventing characters seems to be recognized now as never before, leading to the rise of artist-designers like Jamie McKelvie and Kris Anka, who don’t even need to be on a particular book in order to be called in to make-over the characters. This is a great leap forward in understanding just what a good costume can do — and the special skills required to do it.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

REVIVAL, REINVENTION, RESURRECTION: THE POWER OF GREAT SUPERHERO COSTUME DESIGN

By Andrew Wheeler

We live in a time of awesome superhero costumes in comics. The rise and rise of cosplay culture, the emergence of comic artists with a savvy understanding of fashion, and the slow diversification that’s making heroes palatable to a broader audience, have all contributed to a costuming culture with more to offer than capes and pants.

Superhero costumes have always been an asset to the industry, because iconography helps establish character and create a brand. But the value of costumes in reaching audiences and reinventing characters seems to be recognized now as never before, leading to the rise of artist-designers like Jamie McKelvie and Kris Anka, who don’t even need to be on a particular book in order to be called in to make-over the characters. This is a great leap forward in understanding just what a good costume can do — and the special skills required to do it.

READ MORE

shoomlah

shoomlah:

I promised Lissa that I would take some process photos of how I draw rocks, because it is widely known that LISSA TREIMAN CAN’T DRAW ROCKS apparently, and so here they are!  It’s no video tutorial, but it’s something. :)

So drawing rocks is kinda different from drawing other stuff.
What I love about drawing rocks is that they’re abstract, but they’re abstract with their own logic and history to them.  Rocks look the way the do for a reason- sediments, erosion, eruption, human foot traffic, what have you- and it’s important to suss out those reasons while you’re drawing them.  Sometimes you know why rocks look the way they do (maybe you are intimately familiar with the Colorado plateau, I don’t know your deal), but a lot of the time it’s up to you to silently observe trends and features in the rock that speak to a grander system.

Learning geology is gonna seriously boost your rock-drawing skills.
At Bryce Canyon (technically an amphitheater or pothole!), you’re staring at the Pink Cliffs of the Claron formation- limestone eroded into elaborate fins and hoodoos through an ongoing freeze/thaw cycle.  Unlike the formations in Arches, where you can see elaborate upheavals and folds, Bryce’s sedimentary layers are blessedly flat- you can trace the layers across multiple hoodoos, each of them wearing differently according to their particular mineral composition.  Knowing this, knowing what to look for when you’re drawing a particular formation, is a fantastic tool for you as an artist- as you’re laying in the overall shape, these tiered layers give you visual anchors to check the scale and proportions of the rocks.  Thanks a lot, NATURE.

How I personally draw rocks.
A note about hatching- I generally prefer directional hatching, rather than flatter cross-hatching, when I’m working with pen.  Cross-hatching happens in the process, it’s inevitable, but hatching in a direction consistent with the form you’re drawing tends to make for much more plausible 3D forms that sit well in space.  Look to Franklin Booth and Charles Dana Gibson for some particularly expert hatching inspiration.  Try not to cry.  So!  Onto the process itself:

  • I start out with loose outlines, marking particularly important landmarks, change of planar direction, and any deep pits in the rock- they help to anchor the drawing down the line, and give me a nice base to work on top of.  This is the stage when I panic and think the sketch is going to turn out horribly.  It is an ugly stage.
  • From there, I tend to (apparently, I don’t think this is something I’m considering at the time) block out sections of rock to render with more detail, working the entire surface and trying to keep broader value structures in mind.  Those darker pits in the rock help ground me- they give me a “darkest dark” that I can work against as I’m laying down tones.
  • As I start working on new sections of rock, I’ll jump back and forth to cohere the sections, make sure they sit well in the value structure, that the forms are reading across the rock, etc.
  • While you sketch, make sure you aren’t overworking the surface of the rock- let your eyes go out of focus, and really prioritize where to add value, where to leave swaths of blank paper, etc.
  • Once I’m nearing the end of the sketch, I’ll do a quick pass of overall hatching to make sure the piece reads as a whole.  I love the local colour of the hoodoos- the transitions from pink to orange to white- and so I wanted to make sure there was a hint of that broad value structure in my sketch.
  • Add plants, if available.  Plants make everything better.

And you’re done!  Or, well, you’re kinda cold and your butt’s going numb.  Here’s the final piece I ended up with, alongside an in-focus photo of the rocks for comparison:

…it’s not perfect- I can start to pick it apart now that I have them side by side- but it’s pretty damn close! :)

Have fun drawing rocks ALL DAY LONG,
-C

Claire Hummel rocks.

helpyoudraw

10 typical perspective errors

helpyoudraw:

electricalice:

Drawing perspective is considered one of the hardest things in art, except the mistakes usually done are pretty much always the same and can be avoided with a little care.

1. Lines not reaching the vanishing point

image

Well this is pretty simple to avoid but it’s the most common mistake. It’s probably due to either carelessness or really not having understood the basic of perspective. I encourage you to go back and find some basic tutorial for this.

Anyway, be ALWAYS careful about where to ‘send’ your lines, they NEED to go towards the correct vanishing point or it will just look awkward. Double check if necessary.

And always, ALWAYS use a ruler.

If your style requires lines that are a bit less geometrical (as mine do, I have a style of inking that’s sketchy so ‘perfect’ lines drawn with a ruler usually don’t fit well in the picture) use a ruler anyway for the pencils and then ink later by freehand. At least you’ll have correct guidelines underneath.

image

For traditional drawing be sure you have a ruler and be sure to use it for each one of your lines.

Modern drawing software will help you a lot with this if you draw directly on computer: painting software such as Clip Studio Paint or Manga Studio 4EX or 5 have perspective tools that will automatically snap your lines towards the vanishing point.

image

it’s quite a long tutorial, you’ll find the rest under the Read More or you can download the pdf file here

Read More

jakewyattriot

ziggy9911 asked:

Just curious on how you approach composition and perspective. I feel as if sometimes I think too hard, not really about what to draw but how to draw it and make it look interesting. The comic panels you have been doing are amazing. Any tips/references on improving my knowledge of composition and perspective? What do you think about as you lay your pencil on the drawing paper? what goes through your mind?

jakewyattriot answered:

*STANDARD DISCLAIMER* I’m not handing down life lessons or trying to assert that there’s a ‘correct way’ to draw. I’m just trying to make perspective more approachable for thems that want to tackle it.

Okay. Let’s do this.

1. Understand what perspective is and what it’s for. Stay away from rulers while you get comfortable.

Everyone struggles with perspective because 1. it’s not well or widely taught and 2. artists tend to see linear perspective as a set of rules rather than a set of tools.

Linear perspective is a TOOL we use to create and depict SPACE. That’s it. That’s all it is. Your goal is not to draw in ‘accurate linear perspective.’ Stay away from the ruler and precision for as long as you can. Your goal is to create the illusion of three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional surface. Perspective is just a tool to help you construct and correct that space.

2. Know in your bones that you can ONLY learn to draw in perspective through physical practice. There is no other way.

Grab some paper and draw with me. If you match me drawing for drawing you will be more fluent in linear perspective and spatial drawing by the end of this post. Unfortunately if you don’t, you won’t be.

3. Sketch around in rough perspective. NO RULERS.

So let’s make some simple space. let’s start with a two dimensional surface…image

K. We have a flat, 2D surface. Let’s create some depth by putting a vanishing point in the middle, and having parallel lines converge towards it. Make a gridded plane inside that space.

image

Good. Let’s make that space meaningful by adding a dude and a road or something. (Again, parallel ‘depth lines’ will converge into the vanishing point along the horizon)

image

And now we have the rough illusion of some space. I didn’t use any rulers, and it’s not perfectly accurate, but we got our depth from that vanishing point right in the middle of the page. And since we have a little dude in there, we’ve got human scale, which allows us to gauge the size of the space we’ve created. Gives it meaning.

You need people or cars or some recognizable, human-scale THING in there as a frame of reference or your space won’t mean much to your viewer. Watch. We can make that same basic space a whole lot bigger like this:image

Same vanishing point in the same place, completely different scale, and a totally different feeling of space. Cool, right?

3. Sketch around in rough perspective MORE. STAY LOOSE.

See what sort of spaces and feelings you can create with vanishing points and gridded planes on a post-it or something. Super small, super rough. Feel it out. Pick a vanishing point or lay out a grid in perspective, and MAKE SOME SPACE. Do it. Draw, I don’t know, a lady and her dog in a desert. I’ll do it, too.

image

Good job. LOOK AT YOU creating the illusion of space! This is how you’ll thumbnail and plan anything you want to draw in space. All of my drawings start this way. I think about how I want the viewer to feel and then play around with space and composition until I find something that works.

Once you have a sketch you like, and space that you feel, THEN you can take out the ruler and make it more accurate and convincing.

4. Draw environments from life.

I cannot stress this enough. Draw the world around you, try to draw the shapes and angles as you see them, and you will ‘get’ how and why perspective is used. Use something permanent so that you’ll move fast and commit. I usually use black prismacolor pencil.

You’ll learn or reinforce something with every drawing. I learned a lot about multiple vanishing points from this drawing:

image

Learned from the receding, winding space I tired to draw here:

image

Layered, interior spaces:

image

You get the idea.

image

Life drawing will also help you develop your own shorthand and language for depicting textures, materials, details, natural and architectural features, etc. Do it. Do it all the time. Go to pretty or interesting places just to draw them.

image

Take a second and just draw a quick sketch of whatever room you’re in.

5. Perspective in formal Illustration: apply what you’ve learned.

1. I always start with research. For this particular location I looked at Angkor Wat.

2. Once I had enough reference, I did a bunch of little thumbnail sketches with a very loose sense of space and picked the one I liked best.

3. Scanned the thumbnail and drew a little more clearly over it. Worked out the rough space before using formal perspective.

image

4. Reinforced the space with formal perspective. I dropped in pre-made vanishing points over my drawing. If I were drawing in real media here’s where I’d get out the ruler to sketch in some accurate space.

5. Drew the damn thing. Because I do my research, draw from life, and am comfortable drawing in perspective, I can wing it. I just sort of ‘build’ the ruins freehand in the space I’ve established, keeping it more or less accurate, experimenting and playing with details along the way. I erase a lot, too, both in PS and when drawing in pencil. Keeps it fun for me.

And that’s what I know about composition and perspective. If you want more formal instruction on perspective and it’s uses, you can use John Buscema’s How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way. Or If you want to get really intense about it, Andrew Loomis can help you.

-Jake Wyatt

Jake Wyatt drops some knowledge on perspective and the illusion of depth.

fionastaples

fionastaples:

jigokuen:

A quick peak at my process for painting characters - no backgrounds because I’m lazy. 

I am working on releasing a digital version of SPAM called SPAM Vol. 1.5! It will have all the images in the original book, plus 15 extra pages and at least 3 full, 1 hr -2 hr videos of my process for creating some of the images in the book! 

More information soon on when that will be released. 

Nothing I love more than a process video!

frenden

frenden:

Chronological iterations on a hand lettered logo design. Old to new, top to bottom.

I refined the letters gradually and then began working on sketches for the accompanying mark.The first tree was too busy at small sizes.

The advice at the top of that screenshot is some of the best I’ve ever heard and it applies to almost anything.

Harken unto the wisdom of Frenden!